Published Work

Protecting Your Children From Bad Medicine: How the ADHD Diagnosis Has Been Abused

Reviewed by James Phelps, MD
Dr Phelps is the author of PsychEducation.org and W hy Am I Still Depressed: Recognizing and Managing Bipolar II and Soft Bipolar Disorder (McGraw-Hill). He practices in Corvallis, Ore.
by Manuel Mota-Castillo, Donna Heath, and Andrew Pittington
Self-published, 2007
331 pages $24.95 (softcover)

“All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.”

So said Arthur Schopenhauer, a 19th century philosopher. Mota- Castillo and coauthors, likewise, believe that the multiple dangers of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis will come to be widely recognized, even if such concerns are currently opposed and sometimes ridiculed. These dangers include misconception, misdiagnosis, and mistreatment.

Labeled a “report from the trenches,” the book might also be considered a report from Don Quixote, whom the lead author considers a kindred spirit. They both have a determination to “fight for the right without question or pause.” This creates a book that the author admits is “not a scientific journey but a journalistic-like effort to present simple facts to educate the public.”

The central concern of this book is what is termed the “evil triad”: ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. The authors believe that these labels often conceal an underlying mood disorder